Cultural Territories and Resilience

Cultural Territories and Resilience

Aim

This course attempted to understand urban-scape through the phenomena of culture. The formation of cultural territories trough historical processes and emergence of new transformation through various means in recent time of cultural territories often brings conflicting paradigms. The course attempts to understand and locate such cultural territories through various reading based on sociological and anthropological literature and delineate the cultural led urban transformational process in contemporary times.

Course Objectives

To be able to understand the larger contextual meaning of cultural territories and cultural paradigm in urban discourse and to be able to demonstrate through case studies.

1. The history of urbanization in Indian context is the key response to the social, spiritual, religious and economic needs in cities. The contemporary modes of planning paradigm often neglect or fail to represent the intrinsic and networked condition of Indian historic cities. The course main objective is to understand meaning of various types of cultural territories through literature and reading materials.
2. The elective attempts to identify the forces that underpin such historic networked conditions that are being neglected in planning process and threaten this valuable relationship with diverse historic circumstances in contemporary urban development process. The students are expected to generate various types of maps, demonstrating the cultural territories phenomena.
3. The elective also dissected the cultural territorial aspects of public realm, activity pattern along with history, heritage and understand the resilience system that enables the planning mechanism.
4. The elective also enable the process of theorizing the criteria of mapping and locating such cultural territories through various forces.

Learning Outcomes

 Theoretically understanding the meanings of cultural the way we interpret the everyday cultural phenomena or environment and how they are integral part of existence and develops inherent meaning and brings about cultural changes
 Develop understanding of urban morphology through phenomena of cultural territories.
 Identify various forces in given morphological structure and understand their relationships.
 Identify the possible threats to such territories under various economic and developmental processes.
 Developing arguments for a cultural resilience approach.
 Developing of suitable representational method for urban resilience.

Course Duration

16 weeks, Once a week.

Course Frequency

Every Year

Course Format

Elective/Lectures/ Presentations

Cultural Practices & Resilience

Cultural Practices & Resilience

Aim

To study and review sociological and cultural heritage perspectives on the meaning of resilience from a South Asian lens. The questions of cultural practices in-built in the everyday urbanism of Indian cities are inextricably tied to the questions of resilience. A number of urban studies scholars, sociologists, ecologists, and anthropologists have stressed the importance of deploying a cultural ecology perspective to better understand urbanization, urban processes and urbanism in the Indian context (Baviskar et al 2007, Srinivas 2004, D’Souza and Nagendra 2011). Gidwani and Baviskar (2011) as well as Nagendra and Ostrom (2014), Manjunatha and Nagendra (2016), and Parthasarathy (2011) have engaged with the idea of urban commons in re-theorizing cities in India from a socio-ecological perspective.

Course Objectives

Resilience, as a construct has myriad connotations. In the global South, particularly in South Asia resilience takes a different meaning based on context specific experiences and altogether different challenges posed by cities. Through a variety of scholarly readings and several examples and case studies this elective seeks to develop a holistic sociological understanding of resilience through the lens of cultural practices and every day urbanism in Indian cities. The specific objectives of the course include a better understanding of the following:

• Cultural Heritage, resilience and change
• Case studies for site at risks- Venice, Kyoto, Kathmandu, Jakarta, Rio de janerio, Paris
• Capacity to absorb disturbance
• Adaptability and transformability
• Climate change and heritage
• Resource management
• Memory & place in heritage resilience
• Future of the past

Learning Outcomes

Theoretical understanding of the diverse sociological and cultural heritage perspectives of resilience

• Students will read a variety of scholarly literature with a specific focus on the Global South
• They will simultaneously get a global understanding of the subject
• Develop understanding of urban morphology through phenomena of cultural heritage and social practices
• Identify various forces and possible threats in the morphological structures and understand their relationships
• Develop suitable visual and creative methods to depict urban resilience with specific real-life examples from their eco system.

Course Duration

16 weeks, Once a week.

Course Frequency

Every Year

Course Format

Elective/Lectures/ reading/presentations

Imaging Crises & Resilience

Imaging Crises & Resilience

Aim

The elective approaches issues of resilience through the examination of cultural artefacts, especially those emerging from moving image practices.

Course Objectives

Through diagnostic processes of contextualisation, systemic and formal analysis and narrativisation the cultural artefacts allow insight into our current presumptions and preoccupations, and help to examine the possibilities of understanding and projecting more resilient futures. The cultural artefacts chosen dwell upon particular objects (films, poetry, essays) that grapple with some of the environmental, social and economic anxieties of our contemporary world. They mirror some of the geographies reflected in the other electives that run in tandem.

Learning Outcomes

The intention of the course is to enable students with he ability to critically examine acts of representation. It will enable students to contextualise the work, study its structure and formal characteristics and examine its rhetoric for political and social significance. It would examine the role of the producer, the presumptions of who the audience is meant to be, and the tools deployed, along with a critical analysis of the potentials and pitfalls of the approach deployed.

Course Duration

10 weeks, 2 hrs (once) a week.

Course Frequency

Every Year

Course Format

Short-term Elective

Landscapes. Ecologies of Resilience

Landscapes. Ecologies of Resilience

Aim

This course would open the discussion to explore the notion of Resilience in the context of Indian cities. It would validate many of the urban practices that are often unseen, spontaneously grown that are evolved by communities over time; as being resilient. It would try to realize the potential of such practices within the context of ecological, social and economic resilience that we realize is of prime importance to address the issues of climate change and fragmentation in our contemporary cities. It would also explore the possibilities of such practices informing field of design at all scales – the regional, the neighbourhood as well as the building.

Course Objectives

To be able to initiate the conversation on this subject the course would like to investigate 5 different cases from cities across India. These are site where communities have spontaneously over time evolved a lasting relationship with their surrounds.

1. The eastern wetland of the city of Kolkata is a site where the city’s sewage is treated through an intricate web of open canals and oxidation ponds before it drains into the River Kulti. In the wetlands it has a large holding of fisheries and agricultural farms for growing vegetables where the local community use the sewage water as nutrient. This area which itself is as large as the city of Kolkata has been important in not only treating the city’s wastewater passively, but also playing a important role in achieving resilience related to food.

2. The bazaar area of the indigenous city of Mumbai has over time been know for its unique small-scale entrepreneurial activities of trade, commerce and industries that provide for livelihood activities to numerous local as well as migrant population. Some of these are exceptional crafts which exists only within these complex ecologies of work and live environments. Over years these are threatened by the pressures of redevelopment that gentrify such environments, disempowering such communities as well as erasing such activities.

3. Within the informal settlement of Dharavi their exists a large network of plastic recycling industries that play an important role in reusing the plastic waste of the city. This future of such an important landscape is uncertain due to the new imagination conceived under the Dharavi Redevelopment Project.

4. The Metropolitan Region of Mumbai has numerous fishing villages that are still involved in traditional forms of fishing that is considered ecologically safe and sustainable. Yet such a form of livelihood is constantly threatened by developmental pressure as well as new form of commercial fishing that are extremely exploitative and unsustainable in nature.

5. 68% of the Mumbai Metropolitan region is composed of forests, agricultural/plantation zones and intertidal zones. The forest area in specific are important as they house many tribal villages that overtime have evolved lasting relationship with the surrounding ecology. This is manifested in the use of forest resources, practice of sustainable forms of agriculture as well as in depth knowledge of the local flora and fauna. Yet these communities are always in conflict with the forest officials who have a differing world view of nature as well as the immediate city.

The course would thus investigate these landscapes to be able to identify the unique characteristics of each in creating resilient landscapes, evolve techniques of mapping and representing such landscapes and establish learnings for design.

Learning Outcomes

Establish a methodology to appreciate and validate the contribution made by such communities towards the sustenance and building of resilience with respect to the city.
• Identify all the stakeholders who are associated along with the community and analyse their roles in the community activity.
• Identify the threats and opportunities of the actions by each stakeholder with regards to the activity.
• Generate a scenario so that the threats can be addressed, and the opportunities can be strengthened, so that the community achieves a certain degree of resilience.
• Finally the scenarios and its implication to planning and architectural design would be understood by the learner so that she/he is able to generate sensitive design strategies.

Course Duration

Every Year

Course Frequency

The Course is designed for the Final Year Postgraduate Students to be conducted every year once. (Either in Semester 3 or 4 in the Indian Postgraduate system of two years)

Course Format

Elective/Lectures

Living in Flux: Landscapes as Transformative Response to Climate Change

Living in Flux: Landscapes as Transformative Response to Climate Change

Aim

The course deals with the holistic understanding of urban landscapes as complex ecological systems which encompass the dynamic relation between resilient ecology and space. The course is designed to provide exposure to the students regarding the latest studies, theory and research outcomes of climate change and socio-ecological resilience for human settlements. The students are encouraged to understand advanced concepts and explore relevant contextual frameworks and approaches for the planning and design of urban landscapes.

Course Objectives

a. To introduce students to the concept of ‘Anthropocene’ as a global epoch.
b. To introduce students to advanced principles, concepts and methods of understanding socio-ecological resilience.
c. To enable students to understand and discern the natural processes in the environment and their implications in the urban design and planning.
d. To demonstrate landscape approaches in the planning, design and management of the greenfield and brownfield sites through the help of socially and environmentally appropriate case studies of projects.

Learning Outcomes

The students will be able to:

a. discern relationships between various ecological systems and their interdependence
b. articulate state of the art concepts of ecology and resilience studies
c. use these concepts to develop their studio projects as well as find a trajectory in their future praxis.
d. understand various modes of urban landscape interventions which are less intrusive than the conventional modes of handling sites.
e. identify threats to urban landscapes due to developmental pressures.
f. appreciate the ideas of sustainability and be able to align their thoughts in line with the UN Sustainable

Course Duration

16 weeks

Course Frequency

The Course is designed for the Final Year Postgraduate Students to be conducted every year once. (Either in Semester 3 or 4 in the Indian Postgraduate system of two years)

Course Format

The course is formatted as an Elective Course including Lectures/ Site Visits and Graded Assignments. Elective via Lectures and Presentations (Recorded and streamed online due to the current Covid Pandemic Crisis)

Water Resilience in Historic Cities

Water Resilience in Historic Cities

Aim

Training Urban design and urban conservation professionals in understanding water vulnerabilities and making urban centres water resilient.

Course Objectives

To understand historic cities with relation to their water resources, catchment areas and urbanization patterns thereby intervening in a manner to make them self sufficient in water and climate resilient through appropriate urban infrastructure, planning and policy.

Learning Outcomes

Understanding the water stresses/conditions or water-based stresses that may impact the city’s water basin or its urban fabric and architecture.

Assess the resilience of the city’s water basin, and its geographical and intervened edge conditions

Generate and appraise interventions that yield greater resilience for the city’s water basin/ conditions and its geographical and intervened edge conditions.

Course Duration

8 weeks, Once a week.

Course Frequency

Every Year

Course Format

Elective/Lectures/ Presentation

Enhancing Resilience of Historic Cores

Enhancing Resilience of Historic Cores

Aim

Training Urban Design, Planning and Conservation professionals towards building resilience of native historic cores

Course Objectives

To sensitise students to the diverse factors affecting resilience of native historic cores,

To train participants to identify potentials and vulnerabilities of the historic core.

To encourage participants to develop intervention strategies for strengthening community resilience in the historic cores.

Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to appreciate the relationship between historic built urban scape and the community living & livelihood.

Students will be able to articulate their understanding of the place using perceptual drawings, diagrams and images, videos, annotations etc.

Students will be able to generate maps and infographics used for giving an overview of the of the historic core- its evolutionary timeline, present status and future trajectories.

Students will be able to identify issues affecting the vulnerability of the town and also the potential for developing resilience of the historic core.

Students will be able to apply principles of urban design and conservation for comprehension as well as proposing interventions within the historic core and drafting guidelines for the same.

Course Duration

15 weeks

Course Frequency

Every Year

Course Format

Lectures/ Field work/ Studio/ Workshops

Water Stress and Urban Resilience

Water Stress and Urban Resilience

Aim

Training Urban design and urban conservation professionals in understanding water vulnerabilities and making urban tier II cities water resilient.

Course Objectives

To understand historic tier II cities with relation to their water resources, catchment areas and urbanization patterns thereby intervening in a manner to make them self sufficient in water and climate resilient through appropriate urban infrastructure, planning and policy.

Learning Outcomes

Understanding the water stresses/conditions or water-based stresses that may impact the city’s water basin or its urban fabric and architecture. Assess the resilience of the city’s water basin, and its geographical and intervened edge conditions Generate and appraise interventions that yield greater resilience for the city’s water basin/ conditions and its geo-graphical and intervened edge conditions.

Course Duration

15 weeks, 3.5 hrs studio twice a week.

Course Frequency

Every Semester

Course Format

16 week Studio program or Short-term Elective

BReUCom PDP 2: Understanding Informality – Mapping & Strategising Resilience

BReUCom

PDP 2: Understanding Informality - Mapping & Strategising Resilience

Urban challenges are diverse, and they exist in different forms and with different severity across the world (Schneider 2002). Among other urban challenges, the issue of urban informality and its infrastructure is significant, and has a profound impact on slums dwellers and liveability index. Urban informality is an interdisciplinary concept, and it often refers to issues such as the informal sector, the informal economy, informal settlements and squatter settlements, to name just a few. Urban informality can be broadly defined as the living condition (settlement, economic, commercial, and physical conditions) of urban dwellers and their activities that are non-regularised and non-taxed and are often characterised by different challenges.

 

The professional development program deals engages with the dissemination of knowledge related to urban informality and its central and peripheral issues, with respect to risk and resilience.

 
Registrations close on 18th March 2021 at 13.00 IST
Successful participants will be awarded a joint KRVIA-BReUCom certificate.
 
Link to Register: Registration is Closed
 

BReUCom PDP 1: Contemporary Perspectives on Resilience

BReUCom

PDP 1: Contemporary Perspectives on Resilience

The program titled “Contemporary Perspectives on Resilience” aims to expose the participants to various paradigms of Resilience in modernday urban settings. These range from Socio-ecological and Cultural aspects, to contemporary definitions of the issue of Resilience.
 
Registrations close on 18th March 2021 at 13.00 IST
Successful participants will be awarded a joint KRVIA-BReUCom certificate.
 
Link to Register: Registration is Closed